Lion Air Crash Update: Divers Recover Cockpit Voice Recorder

Lion Air 737 MAX

Indonesian Navy divers have recovered the Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) from Lion Air 610. The aircraft, a 737 MAX, crashed into the Java Sea in October with 189 people on board. The CVR was located through pings from the acoustic beacon located on the CVR. It was buried under 26 feet of mud, which slowed the recovery. The CVR was located not far from where the flight data recorder which was found days after the crash.

Indonesia's National Transportation Safety Committee (KNKT) officer shows a cockpit voice recorder (CVR) of a Lion Air JT610 that crashed into Tanjung Karawang sea, on the deck of Indonesia's Navy ship KRI Spica-934 at Karawang sea in West Java
Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee (KNKT) officer shows a cockpit voice recorder (CVR) of a Lion Air JT610 that crashed into Tanjung Karawang sea, on the deck of Indonesia’s Navy ship KRI Spica-934 at Karawang sea in West Java, Indonesia, January 14, 2019 in this photo taken by Antara Foto. Antara Foto/Aprillio Akbar/ via REUTERS

The CVR pings for up to 90 days so it was crucial to recover the device quickly. Officials hope that the data contained within the CVR paints a clearer picture of what occurred during the fatal flight. It could take up to three months to download and analyze the data.

Since the accident, the relationship between Lion Air and Boeing is strained (to put it mildly), especially after Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee released initial findings from the crash. Lion Air contends that Boeing withheld information about the system that led to the downing of the aircraft.

Final Word

I am happy that the CVR has been recovered. The data contained should give investigators a better picture of the moments prior to the crash. I also hope that the information provides some closure for the families.

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